Khazaria and Russia in the Notitiae Episcopatuum

Alex Feldman is a final-year PhD candidate at the University of Birmingham’s Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies.  This essay is adapted from the presentation he recently gave at the Ecclesiastical History Society Postgraduate Conference at Newman University, Birmingham, on 7 March, 2018 Byzantium (the Christian Roman empire) and Russia are frequently thought…

Why the Church and the Law?

Professor Rosamond McKitterick is President of the Ecclesiastical History Society 2018-19. Here she explains her choice of theme for the annual Summer meeting 2018 and winter, selected papers from which will form the volume Studies in Church History 56.   My first paper at an international conference as a very young graduate student (and consequently…

The Church of England and Education for Surrey Girls, 1870 – 1914.

Catherine Freeman is a part time doctoral student at the University of Greenwich. She is looking at education and employment for girls in Surrey between 1870 and 1914 and the relationships with ideas of respectable femininity across classes. This piece focusses on some of her research into an industrial school for girls, the archives for…

The Vicar-Turned-Anchorite of North Petherwin, Cornwall

Rebecca Springer is a lecturer in history at Oriel College, Oxford. She recently completed a DPhil thesis on local religious life in late twelfth-century England. Her essay on the moral duty of prelates to educate their subordinates, which was presented at the Summer 2017 Conference, will appear in Vol. 55 of Studies in Church History….

British Sunday Schools in the era of the First World War, 1900 – 1939 

– Caitriona McCartney My thesis intends to address importance of British Sunday schools and assess their effectiveness in the era of the First World War. In doing so my research will demonstrate the significance of religious belief and practice in Britain during the early twentieth century. It is difficult in a more secular twenty-first century…

Witnessing the Medieval English Parish Church

Since taking up a research fellowship at a single-subject institution last year, I’ve perhaps become a little too comfortable in my material-oriented art historical world. The Ecclesiastical History Society’s postgraduate colloquium in March was a welcome opportunity to widen my disciplinary boundaries.

The Shrine That Never Was: The Anglo-Saxons and the Relics of Gregory I

Miriam Adan Jones is a PhD candidate at the Faculty of Theology, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, studying early medieval church history. She is preparing a thesis on the role ethnic identities played in the Anglo-Saxon church. In 2016, she was awarded the EHS’s Michael Kennedy Prize for her paper on the language of baptism in early…

Remembering Martin Bucer

Stephen Tong is an Australian in his third year of PhD research at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, which is partly funded by the Cambridge Commonwealth Trust. He is investigating evangelical ecclesiology during the Edwardian Reformation with a particular focus on developments in liturgy. At the 2016 EHS summer conference (for which he was awarded a…

The Queen Caroline Affair and the Politicisation of the Church of England

Nicholas Dixon is an AHRC-funded second-year PhD student at Pembroke College, Cambridge. His doctoral research concerns the political and social influence of the Church of England during the early nineteenth century, with a particular focus on the Anglican clergy’s involvement in parliamentary politics, elementary education and tract distribution. He has also investigated various aspects of the Church’s relationship with the British monarchy and, at this year’s EHS summer conference (for which he was awarded a bursary), presented a paper on Queen Adelaide’s role in promoting Anglicanism in Malta. This post, which describes the implications of the ‘Queen Caroline Affair’ for the Church, draws together two important themes of his enquiries: the religious dimension of monarchy and clerical political activity.